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Design & Technology

Head of Department: Mr J Russen

Design & Technology is studied in Years 7-9. Pupils work on a rotation system studying three projects a year across Design & Technology and Food & Nutrition. Pupils can continue to study within the field of Design & Technology or Food & Nutrition in Years 10-11 as an option subject. The option choices available include GCSE Design & Technology, Cambridge National Level 1/ 2 in Engineering and GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition.

Year 7

The DT curriculum introduces pupils to creative thinking and problem solving, whilst developing skills to communicate ideas effectively and realise them as models or finished practical outcomes. There are opportunities to experiment with and investigate a range of materials, techniques, processes and approaches. As their designs develop, pupils are encouraged to take risks and think in alternative ways, producing individualised outcomes within a class. Pupils learn within three key areas of study during Year 7 and they will be assessed during each unit of work. We intend to teach the following projects if circumstances allow.

Unit

Knowledge and Skills 

Communication

Pupils will be introduced to a range of communication skills throughout this unit of work. Pupils will be taught how to communicate their ideas through drawing techniques such as oblique drawing, one point perspective drawing, two- point perspective drawing and crating. Alongside this, pupils will learn how to annotate their ideas effectively to best communicate their thoughts surrounding their ideas. Finally, pupils will learn how to use the CAD program ‘Sketch Up’ so they can produce realistic renders of their ideas. 

Key Assessment: portfolio of drawing work, annotations, CAD drawings and end of unit knowledge test on drawing techniques. 

Food Preparation and Nutrition

Pupils will be introduced to the kitchen environment and cooking techniques including learning how to use knives, stoves and the oven safely and hygienically. They will build up skills through demonstrations and practical making activities which focus on the key skills of chopping, frying, baking and tidying up. Pupils will learn about healthy eating relating to the ‘eat well’ plate and different ways of analysing dishes through sensory analysis. Pupils will utilise their skills to design and make their own healthy dish.

Please be aware that pupils will need to bring their own ingredients to cook with and will require a large watertight container to transport their dishes home- they will be given recipe sheets in the lesson prior to their practical.

Key assessment: Assessed practical outcome

Metals 

The ‘Metals’ project provides pupils with a toolkit of further strategies for creative idea generation that they can use throughout and beyond the course. They will spend quality time developing their ideas into realistic design solutions, which they will plan and make following experimentation with different material options. This year, pupils will work with Pewter and learn how to cast. Pupils will need to plan effectively, taking into account constraints such as time and materials. As they make their designs, they will become familiar with the workshop environment, tools, equipment and processes such as cutting, joining and forming. They will gain understanding of how to safely use hand-held tools and machines such as the hegna saws and pillar drill. They will test and evaluate their product to consolidate their learning.

Key assessment: Final idea milestone, final practical outcome and end of unit knowledge test on metals

Groupings

Pupils will be taught in either all male or all female mixed ability classes. Pupils will be taught by the same teacher throughout the year for each area of the curriculum.

Homework Information 

Homework will be set every two weeks and should take students an average of 30 minutes to complete. 

Equipment

Food Preparation and Nutrition – pupils will be expected to bring ingredients from home, along with a large container so that food can be safely transported. They will be told each week what is needed. Pupils on free school meals should inform the Head of Department if they require ingredients to be provided.

Metals – pupils may bring a craft apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided.

Year 8

The DT curriculum is designed to embed the learning of creative thinking and problem solving from Year 7, whilst developing skills effectively to communicate ideas and realise them as models or finished practical outcomes. Students will continue to experiment with and investigate a range of materials, techniques, processes and approaches. As their designs develop, students are encouraged to take risks and think in alternative ways, producing individualised outcomes within a class. Students learn within three key areas of study during Key Stage Three. We intend to teach the following projects if circumstances allow.

Unit

Knowledge and Skills

Polymers

This unit of work aims to provide students with a toolkit of further strategies for creative idea generation which they can use throughout and beyond the course. They will spend quality time developing their ideas into realistic design solutions, which they will plan and make following experimentation with polypropylene. This year, students will work mainly with sheet polypropylene to make a creative piece of lighting design. Students will need to plan effectively, taking into account constraints such as time and materials. As they make their designs, they will develop their skills in a workshop environment using tools, equipment and construction processes such as cutting and joining. They will also gain familiarity with heat processes such as bending and forming using a plastics oven and line bender. They will test and evaluate their product to consolidate their learning.

Key assessment: Final idea milestone, final practical outcome and end of unit knowledge test on polymers

DOT - Dexterity & Vision

In this unit of work, students will explore the topic of inclusive design and work through the cyclical process of iterative design. Pupils will look at how to design for all rather than just designing for one part of a diverse population. Using their research and task analysis’s, pupils will respond to a design brief and produce a series of conceptual models working through an iterative design process leading to a final practical outcome. All resources have been provided via the DOT project in collaboration with the University of Cambridge. 
Key assessment: Final idea milestone and final practical outcome and end of unit knowledge test on anthropometrics and ergonomics

Food

Building on skills learnt in the year 7 cooking module, students will develop their skills within the kitchen environment. Working in parallel with their food unit in Spanish, students will be asked to design and make their very own tapas dish. In order to build the foundation for this final practical outcome, students will conduct some focused practical cooking tasks following recipes, which will introduce several cooking skills. As this project is conducted after the food unit in Spanish lessons, students will be encouraged to converse about their tapas dish through the language of its origin!

Key assessment: Final recipe milestone and final practical outcome

Groupings    

Students will be taught in their tutor groups and therefore will be fully mixed ability and gender. However, there are some exceptions to this where students will not be in their tutor group. This decision will be made by the Head of Department. Students will be taught by the same teacher throughout the year for each area of the curriculum.

Homework Information

Homework will be set every two weeks and should take students an average of 30 minutes to complete.

Equipment

Food Preparation and Nutrition – pupils will be expected to bring ingredients from home, along with a large container so that food can be safely transported. They will be told each week what is needed. Pupils on free school meals should inform the Head of Department if they require ingredients to be provided.

Polymers – pupils may bring a craft apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided.

DOT Dexterity and Vision - pupils may bring a craft apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided.

Year 9

The DT curriculum is designed to embed the learning of creative thinking and problem solving from Year 7 and Year 8, whilst developing skills effectively to communicate ideas and realise them as models or finished practical outcomes. Pupils will continue to experiment with and investigate a range of materials, techniques, processes and approaches. As their designs develop, pupils are encouraged to take risks and think in alternative ways, producing individualised outcomes within a class. We intend to teach the following projects if circumstances allow.

 Unit

Knowledge and Skills

Material Exploration

In this unit of work, students will explore the topic of designing an inclusive product. Whilst designing, students will explore the properties and qualities of different materials when testing their ideas. Students will take the project in the direction of their choosing designing for a primary user and other stakeholders. 

Key assessment: Final idea milestone, final practical outcome, and a manufacturing diary.

Asthma Project

Pupils will be given a real life design problem and they will need to respond to the design brief in a creative and unique manor. The challenge is to re-brand the packaging for asthma inhalers and asthma equipment for users under the age of 5 to improve the experience for all stakeholders. Pupils will research into why this problem exists, explore different ideas that aim to solve the problem and then through development work and feedback they will arrive at a final idea. The final prototype will need to meet all of the design specification criteria.

Key assessment: Final idea milestone and final practical outcome

Food

Pupils will be learning about a range of different food and hygiene topics such as food safety and hygiene, healthy eating, reference intakes, fair trade and food miles and functional properties of ingredients. Alongside this pupils will cook a range of dishes that build on their skillset learnt in previous years

Key assessment: Final practical outcomes and end of unit knowledge test

Groupings    

Pupils will be taught in fully mixed ability and gender groups. Pupils will be taught by the same teacher throughout the year for each area of the curriculum.

Homework Information

Homework will be set weekly and should take pupils an average of 30 minutes to complete.

Equipment

Food Preparation and Nutrition – pupils will be expected to bring ingredients from home, along with a large container so that food can be safely transported. They will be told each week what is needed. Pupils on free school meals should inform the Head of Department if they require ingredients to be provided.

Material Exploration – pupils may bring a craft apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided.

Asthma – pupils may bring a craft apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided.

 

Years 10 & 11

GCSE Design and Technology 

Course Content

The course is spilt into the following two areas:

* Component 01 - Principles of Design and Technology - 2-hour external examination - 50% of final grade.

* Component 02 - Iterative Design Challenge - Approximately 40 hours of internal controlled          assessment - 50% of final grade.

Before students start Component 02 in June of Year 10, they will work on multiple short projects focusing on developing their design skills, making skills and theoretical knowledge of a whole range materials and processes. 

Component 02 will start in June of the first year of the course. Students will design and make a product using the iterative design process that responds to a contextual challenge released by the exam board on June 1st. At the end of the project, students will submit multiple prototypes, a final prototype and a design portfolio that explains the journey of their idea and how they have attempted to respond to the contextual challenge.

Following the submission of the controlled assessment, students will then focus their attention to Component 01 which is a 2-hour written examination testing the theoretical aspect of the course.

Homework

Pupils should expect to receive an hour of homework a week, which will consist of a variety of research, design-based tasks, and revision for formative tests.

Equipment

Pupils may bring a craft apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided. All workshop tools will be provided. Pupils are required to purchase the course textbook and course revision guide to aid them with their studies.

Visits/Extra-curricular

In year 10 pupils will go to the Design Museum in London and participation in work experience to gain vital design experience is an optional element of the course but is encouraged.

 

Engineering Manufacture

Course Content

Students will study four units which will provide them with a clear and coherent understanding of the world of engineering manufacture. Considerable time is spent learning both practically and theoretically about many engineering manufacturing techniques and processes. 

In Y10 we will focus on:

  1. R109: Engineering materials, processes, and production -This unit allows students to develop their understanding of a wide range of engineering materials and how their properties and characteristics impact on a design specification. Students will also examine different production processes and their applications.
  2. R110: Preparing and planning for manufacture -This unit allows students to plan and apply appropriate processes to make a pre-production product using hand-held tools, measuring, and marking equipment safely. Students then carry out a range of manually controlled machining operations and perform quality control checks to review their finished pre-production product.

In Y11 we focus on:

  1. R111: Computer-aided manufacturing. This unit allows students to explore the role of computer applications in the design and manufacture of engineered products by creating computer-aided design (CAD) drawings to produce a batch of computer numerical control (CNC) manufactured examples of a product. Students then investigate into methods used to compare items manufactured by manually controlled and CNC production and develop their understanding of how computer control is used to produce engineered products in high-volume.
  2. R112: Quality control of engineered products -Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of the techniques and procedures used, including ‘lean processes’ to ensure the quality of engineered products. Students will produce and implement a detailed set of procedures for the quality control of engineered products in a ‘real world’ situation involving high-volume manufacture of products.

Homework

Pupils should expect to receive an hour of homework a week, which will consist of a variety of research, engineering-based tasks, and revision for formative tests.

Equipment

Pupils may bring a craft apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided. All workshop tools will be provided. Pupils are required to purchase the course textbook and course revision guide to aid them with their studies.

Visits/Extra-curricular

Participation in work experience to gain vital engineering experience is an optional element of the course but is encouraged.

 

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

Course Content

The course is spilt into five areas; food, nutrition and health, food science, food safety, food choice and food provenance. 

Pupils will complete three assessments:

  • Paper : Food Preparation and Nutrition - written exam (1 hour and 45 minutes), 100 marks and worth 50% of GCSE grade.
  • Non-Exam Assessment (NEA) - Task 1 - Food Investigation - Students understand the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients. 
  • Non-Exam Assessment (NEA) - Task 2 - Food Preparation Assessement - Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved. 

Homework

Pupils should expect to receive an hour of homework a week, which will consist of a variety of research, food preparation and nutrition-based tasks, and revision for formative tests.

Equipment

Pupils may bring an apron to lessons. However, aprons are provided. All kitchen tools will be provided. Pupils are required to purchase ingredients, the course textbook and course revision guide to aid them with their studies.

Visits/Extra-curricular

Participation in work experience to gain vital food preparation and nutrition experience is an optional element of the course but is encouraged.